An endoscopy is a treatment that allows your doctor to see inside your body’s organs directly. Some disorders may be diagnosed and treated as a result of this. An endoscope is a thin, flexible tube that has a lights and a camera at the tip. It enters your body through a natural orifice, such as your mouth, or by a small cut in your skin. Endoscopy allows the doctor to view pictures of your interior organs on a screen. An endoscopy is normally not uncomfortable, however your doctor may provide a little sedative or anaesthetic. As a result, if possible, arrange for someone to assist you in returning home. You should not eat or drink anything for several hours before an endoscopy. Your doctor will advise you on how long you should fast before your surgery. A bowel preparation is required if you are undergoing a colonoscopy. Your doctor will provide you with precise instructions on what you must do in endoscopy clinic.

 

  • Before the procedure, you may be given a local or general anaesthetic, as well as a sedative to help you relax. You may or may not be aware of what is going on at the moment, and you are unlikely to recall anything.
  • The doctor will gently insert the endoscope and inspect the area being checked. A sample (biopsy) may be collected from you. You may have diseased tissue removed.
  • Your medical staff will keep an eye on you in the recovery area until the anaesthesia or sedative wears off. If you are in pain, you may be given pain medication. If you were sedated, you should make arrangements for someone to drive you home following the treatment.
  • Your doctor in endoscopy clinic may review the findings of your tests and schedule a follow-up consultation. If you have any major side effects, you should see your doctor right away. Fever, significant discomfort or bleeding, or if you are concerned are examples.